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Sunday, August 31, 2008

Another tree stand.........hopefully another buck....

We didn't have to go far to find another spot to establish a good tree stand. Hopefully the buck which has so far made us on a few occasions will miss us this time. We'll definately post our results in the up coming months. Check back often.

Its getting to be that time

Its getting to be that time when some early scouting can reveal where some bicg bucks are making their mark. We took a brief wander through our property and found that a few of the traditional scrapes were already being tended. So what better time than the present to set up your tree stand. We'll be sure to report back with our results.

Tuesday, August 19, 2008

Giant Hogweed................be cautious

Giant Hogweed – General Information

What Is Giant Hogweed?

Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is a perennial member of the parsley or carrot family originally native to Asia but now found naturally in South Central Ontario. It closely resembles cow parsnip and Queen Anne’s Lace except, as its name suggests, it is characterized by its large size and may grow as high as 6 meters. Aside from its immense size, Giant Hogweed can also be distinguished by its stout, dark reddish stem that can grow 5-10 cm in diameter. Leaf stalks are spotted and can produce a leaf that can expand to 1.5 meters across (see picture below). Each leaf is deeply grooved or divided. Stems and stalks are hollow and produce course hairs around a blister like area on the plant. In summer, small, white flowers form together to make up an umbrella-shaped head that can reach 1 meter in diameter.

Where is Giant Hogweed Found ?

Giant Hogweed can be found in scattered localities across Southern Ontario however, isolated plants have been documented as far north as Haliburton County. Although it may grow in a wide variety of habitats, it is most often found along roadsides, other right of ways, vacant lots, wet areas (stream and river banks) and waste areas.

Why be concerned about Giant Hogweed?

The blister like areas on stems and stalks leak a clear watery sap containing chemicals classified as psoralens, which can sensitize the skin to ultraviolet radiation. Exposure to sunlight following contact with these chemicals causes severe burns that usually result in blistering and painful dermatitis. Blisters can develop into purplish or blackened scars sometimes up to 48 hours after exposure. In some cases, skin contact can lead to recurring dermatitis and eye contact can lead to temporary or possibly permanent blindness.

Who is at increased risk of exposure?

Employees working outdoors in areas such as roadsides, other right of ways, near streams or river banks are potentially at risk of exposure to this plant.

How can I protect myself?

· Review the above pictures so that you are aware of what the plant looks like.
· Avoid contact with the plant.
· Wear a long sleeved shirt and long pants to avoid skin contact.


What should I do if I come in contact with this plant?

· Wash the affected area with soap and water.
· Keep affected areas out of direct sunlight.
· Seek medical advice at the earliest opportunity.

Monday, August 11, 2008

Employment in the Great Outdoors

This blog entry is dedicated to all those who are interested in finding a career in the great outdoors. In Ontario, BC, or anywhere in Canada. I will provide some direct links for you to search on an ongoing basis. There is nothing better than finding employment in a field of study you enjoy. When it means that you get to hunt and fish and enjoy the outdoors as part of your job..........even better! I have worked as a Planner, Surveyor, Park Maintenance Worker, Park Superintendent, Forest Officer to name a few..........I enjoyed them all! So here are some direct links to job resources for you to book mark; check back often. Province of Ontario http://www.gojobs.gov.on.ca/Jobs.aspx?Language=English ; Conservation Authorities Of Ontario http://conservation-ontario.on.ca/jobs/index.html ; Federal Government http://jobs-emplois.gc.ca/menu/home_e.htm ; to find jobs in other provinces go to this website click on the province and look for their postings, they all have postings http://canada.gc.ca/othergov-autregouv/prov-eng.html Goos luck these are only a few, check out this one too for lodge jobs http://www.out-there.com/employ_m.htm Let me know if you hook up with a career you love. I'll post your success story.

Sunday, August 10, 2008

Ontario Monster Whitetails Magazine

Ontario's leading source for educational, entertaining and simply amazing stories about Ontario deer hunting. The magazine is devoted to reaching out to the grassroots hunting community with detailed stories and pictures of how hunters around the province are successful in harvesting Ontario's biggest bucks.This is not a magazine for trophy hunters alone; instead this magazine celebrates and honours the trophy animals that roam this great land with riveting stories, detailed tips, jaw-dropping photographs and sound advice from the hunters themselves. Readers will be intrigued when they see that the hunters whose stories are found in the pages of Ontario Monster Whitetails magazine will be the "kid next door" or "the guys in the camp down the road".Ontario Monster Whitetails celebrates the time-honoured traditions that sportsmen and women have passed on for generations of time. We, at Ontario Monster Whitetails, are dedicated to providing a magazine appealing to both older and younger generations to learn tips and tactics from those who know.With 4 issues per year featuring stories from every corner of this province, every deer hunter who ventures into the great Ontario outdoors will eagerly await the day when their issue arrives in the mailbox so they too can read about the monster whitetails in their neck of the woods.

Not everyone needs to catch a big fish to put a smile on their face


This was the results of fishing the shoreline of Ahmic Lake for a couple of hours. It still brought a smile to a newly hooked fisher-woman.

Outdoors Ontario Slideshow